Editor's Сhoice
August 21, 2019
© Photo: Wikimedia

FREE WEST MEDIA

An analysis released on August 14 by the Economic Policy Institute, a left-leaning think tank, found that chief executive compensation had grown 940 percent since 1978, by one measure, while typical worker compensation had risen by only 12 percent over the same period.

Democratic presidential candidate Senator Elizabeth Warren has even proposed a plan that would require US corporations to turn over part of their board of directors to members chosen by employees.

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, another 2020 hopeful, says he would prohibit corporations from buying back their own stock — a move that drives up share prices — unless they offer their workers some benefits in return.

The organisation representing the nation’s most powerful chief executives, have meanwhile devised a plan to ignore shareholders’ interests in order to concentrate further on their own wealth. Corporate executives posing as moral, believe they would face less criticism for their greed.

The new statement, released Monday by the Business Roundtable, suggests that the widening income inequality, and rising expectations from the public about corporate behavior, will be addressed through “diversity” politics.

“Americans deserve an economy that allows each person to succeed through hard work and creativity and to lead a life of meaning and dignity,” reads the friendly-sounding statement from the organisation, which is chaired by JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon.

The Business Roundtable says its members “share a fundamental commitment to all of our stakeholders” according to a report in the Washington Post.

The new statement includes 181 signatures of the 192 current members of the Business Roundtable, which represents many of the biggest companies in the United States. But while the statement represents an obvious change in the group’s thinking, it was not clear how companies would change their outrageous corporate packages in light of their new commitments, nor how any changes in behavior would be assessed or monitored.

But what is clear nevertheless is that global corporations facing increasing pressure, will now be focusing all their attentions on divisive issues that impact society at large.

Thus, giant tech companies will target immigration and border control agencies and Walmart will stop selling guns after a recent mass shooting in one of its stores.

Senior corporate leaders have understood that controversial social issues ranging from racism to LGBTQ rights will divide consumers and in doing so, it will take the focus away from the wealth that executives have amassed.

Burger King and Mercedes-Benz are two notable mega-corporations that have recently released commercials promoting LGBTQ rights.

In Hungary, an advertising campaign, “Love is Love,” was launched by the Coca-Cola Company ahead of a music festival in Budapest. Political leaders are calling for a boycott of the global soft drink company.

Budapest has been covered with images of gay couples kissing or in friendly intimate poses, leading up to the Sziget Festival which ran from August 7 to August 13, announcing: “Zero Sugar, Zero Prejudice.”

Hungarian Deputy Speaker and Parliament Member István Boldog, along with conservative media outlets, called for a boycott of Coke products .

“If Hungarian society accepts this, there will be more such steps. Posters, commercials, films, rainbow products, etc. and will become increasingly difficult to stop,” a petition which was launched against the posters, stated.

But a spokesperson for Coke said in a statement that it “strives for diversity, inclusion, and equality in our business, and we support these rights in society as well”.

“As a long-standing supporter of the LGBTQI community, we believe everyone has the right to love the person they choose. The campaign currently running in Hungary reflects these values,” the statement read.

The company has not seen a decrease in sales in Hungary due to the controversy, said the spokesperson.

Andras Veres, head of the Hungarian Catholic Bishops’ Conference (MKPK), has meanwhile expressed his solidarity and support for the Polish Catholic Bishops’ Conference after Archbishop of Krakow Marek Jedraszewski came under fire for a speech criticising “LGBTQ ideologies”.

Jedraszewski came under fire from the Polish left wing and liberals, including the liberal Catholic weekly Tygodnik Powszechny, after mentioning a “rainbow-coloured epidemic” in a sermon commemorating the anniversary of the outbreak of the Warsaw uprising on August 1.

“History has taught us that standing up for the teachings of Christian faith often causes anger in others,” Veres wrote in a letter posted on the MKPK website and addressed to Stanislaw Gadecki, the head of the Polish Catholic Bishops’ Conference.

“Still, we are dumbfounded by the undeserved attacks you suffered, since all you did was explicate the teachings of the Catholic church in connection with a current phenomenon,” he said.

Veres said it was shocking that the same people who “demanded that their opinion should be accepted” denied others “even the right to express a differing opinion”.

It appears that some are not interested in fostering “diversity and inclusion” when it comes to certain ideologies. Instead they are interested in advancing globalism and crushing all dissenters.

Amazon has banned hundreds of conservative books, Apple has banned conservative websites and pro-lifers, Salesforce has banned gun sellers and Bank of America and Chase Bank have both closed bank accounts of conservatives speaking out against globalists.

freewestmedia.com

The views of individual contributors do not necessarily represent those of the Strategic Culture Foundation.
Globalists Plan to Hide Wealth Gap With Divisive Social Issues

FREE WEST MEDIA

An analysis released on August 14 by the Economic Policy Institute, a left-leaning think tank, found that chief executive compensation had grown 940 percent since 1978, by one measure, while typical worker compensation had risen by only 12 percent over the same period.

Democratic presidential candidate Senator Elizabeth Warren has even proposed a plan that would require US corporations to turn over part of their board of directors to members chosen by employees.

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, another 2020 hopeful, says he would prohibit corporations from buying back their own stock — a move that drives up share prices — unless they offer their workers some benefits in return.

The organisation representing the nation’s most powerful chief executives, have meanwhile devised a plan to ignore shareholders’ interests in order to concentrate further on their own wealth. Corporate executives posing as moral, believe they would face less criticism for their greed.

The new statement, released Monday by the Business Roundtable, suggests that the widening income inequality, and rising expectations from the public about corporate behavior, will be addressed through “diversity” politics.

“Americans deserve an economy that allows each person to succeed through hard work and creativity and to lead a life of meaning and dignity,” reads the friendly-sounding statement from the organisation, which is chaired by JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon.

The Business Roundtable says its members “share a fundamental commitment to all of our stakeholders” according to a report in the Washington Post.

The new statement includes 181 signatures of the 192 current members of the Business Roundtable, which represents many of the biggest companies in the United States. But while the statement represents an obvious change in the group’s thinking, it was not clear how companies would change their outrageous corporate packages in light of their new commitments, nor how any changes in behavior would be assessed or monitored.

But what is clear nevertheless is that global corporations facing increasing pressure, will now be focusing all their attentions on divisive issues that impact society at large.

Thus, giant tech companies will target immigration and border control agencies and Walmart will stop selling guns after a recent mass shooting in one of its stores.

Senior corporate leaders have understood that controversial social issues ranging from racism to LGBTQ rights will divide consumers and in doing so, it will take the focus away from the wealth that executives have amassed.

Burger King and Mercedes-Benz are two notable mega-corporations that have recently released commercials promoting LGBTQ rights.

In Hungary, an advertising campaign, “Love is Love,” was launched by the Coca-Cola Company ahead of a music festival in Budapest. Political leaders are calling for a boycott of the global soft drink company.

Budapest has been covered with images of gay couples kissing or in friendly intimate poses, leading up to the Sziget Festival which ran from August 7 to August 13, announcing: “Zero Sugar, Zero Prejudice.”

Hungarian Deputy Speaker and Parliament Member István Boldog, along with conservative media outlets, called for a boycott of Coke products .

“If Hungarian society accepts this, there will be more such steps. Posters, commercials, films, rainbow products, etc. and will become increasingly difficult to stop,” a petition which was launched against the posters, stated.

But a spokesperson for Coke said in a statement that it “strives for diversity, inclusion, and equality in our business, and we support these rights in society as well”.

“As a long-standing supporter of the LGBTQI community, we believe everyone has the right to love the person they choose. The campaign currently running in Hungary reflects these values,” the statement read.

The company has not seen a decrease in sales in Hungary due to the controversy, said the spokesperson.

Andras Veres, head of the Hungarian Catholic Bishops’ Conference (MKPK), has meanwhile expressed his solidarity and support for the Polish Catholic Bishops’ Conference after Archbishop of Krakow Marek Jedraszewski came under fire for a speech criticising “LGBTQ ideologies”.

Jedraszewski came under fire from the Polish left wing and liberals, including the liberal Catholic weekly Tygodnik Powszechny, after mentioning a “rainbow-coloured epidemic” in a sermon commemorating the anniversary of the outbreak of the Warsaw uprising on August 1.

“History has taught us that standing up for the teachings of Christian faith often causes anger in others,” Veres wrote in a letter posted on the MKPK website and addressed to Stanislaw Gadecki, the head of the Polish Catholic Bishops’ Conference.

“Still, we are dumbfounded by the undeserved attacks you suffered, since all you did was explicate the teachings of the Catholic church in connection with a current phenomenon,” he said.

Veres said it was shocking that the same people who “demanded that their opinion should be accepted” denied others “even the right to express a differing opinion”.

It appears that some are not interested in fostering “diversity and inclusion” when it comes to certain ideologies. Instead they are interested in advancing globalism and crushing all dissenters.

Amazon has banned hundreds of conservative books, Apple has banned conservative websites and pro-lifers, Salesforce has banned gun sellers and Bank of America and Chase Bank have both closed bank accounts of conservatives speaking out against globalists.

freewestmedia.com