World
Wayne Madsen
April 10, 2014
© Photo: Public domain

While the world’s eyes were transfixed on the events in Ukraine, with U.S. government officials and legislators making pilgrimages to Kiev to egg on the motley assortment of neo-fascists and World Bank globalists who, through civil disruption, intimidation, and violence, overthrew the democratically-elected government of President Viktor Yanukovych, the United States was busy carving a new identity for the nation of Yemen. Constantly under attack from CIA drones and cruise missiles, Yemen, which ousted its longtime dictator Ali Abdullah Saleh, during the “Arab Spring” movement, has now had a Western-imposed federation foisted upon it…

Recently, the pro-U.S. president, Abdrahab Mansur Hadi, and representatives from only a fraction of Yemen’s political parties, agreed to form a six-region federation that resulted from a so-called “national dialogue.” However, the plan announced in January by the much-ballyhooed National Dialogue Conference ignored the aspirations of the stakeholders in Yemen’s future, particularly the people of the former independent People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen, or South Yemen, who want their sovereignty restored after years of brutal rule from the Saleh regime in Sana’a in north Yemen.

Neither did the “dialogue” take into account the legitimate demands of the Shi’a Muslim minority in the north who have suffered from constant attacks from the Sana’a regime, attacks sometimes joined by military forces from neighboring Saudi Arabia. The Saudis never miss a chance to attack any group seen as being in league with Iran, whether they are the Shi’a majority of Bahrain, the Alawite minority of Syria, or the Shi’a Houthi minority of north Yemen.

Rather than split Yemen into its two former constituent regions, the former independent North Yemen and South Yemen, the foreign-directed “nation –builders” in Yemen opted to create six regions because they feared a region of South Yemen would provide the impetus for the region to re-establish its independence, lost when South Yemen agreed to merge with Yemen in an fateful and disastrous union in 1990.

The proposed six-region federation was largely the brainchild of the past U.S. ambassador to Yemen, Gerald Feierstein, who also served as deputy consul general in Jerusalem. Feierstein, who served as ambassador in Sana’a until October 2013, mirrored the interventionist style of other U.S. diplomats carrying certain ideological “baggage,” namely U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Geoffrey Pyatt and Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs Victoria Nuland (Nudelman).

The northern province of Saada, where most of the Shi’a Houthi live was cobbled together with the new Azal region, which also includes Sana’a, the capital. The Houthi Ansarullah rebel commander stated that Saada and the Houthis lost its special identity as a region having closer ties to coastal Hajja and Jawf than with Sana’a. However, considering Feierstein’s more than problematic ties with the Zionist-influenced neo-conservatives in Washington, the drawing of the borders of Azal had much to do with pleasing the enemies of the Houthis in Riyadh and Tel Aviv and sending a stark warning to the friends of the Houthis in Tehran.

Ansarullah leaders also realized that the Azal region was poor in natural resources with no maritime access. In other words, Feierstein and company punished the Shi’as by combining their province with the poorest region in Yemen and one that would lack economic clout in the new Yemeni federation. The other three proposed regions in the north are Saba, Janad, and Tahama. Rather than a unified South Yemen, the former independent socialist republic is divided into Aden and Hadramaut. The plan for South Yemen reflects hot the British Empire divided the territory.

The British ruled South Yemen directly through the Aden Protectorate, later the Federation of South Arabia, and through local sultans of Quaiti, Mahra, and Kathiri states through the Protectorate of South Arabia in the Hadramaut. Feierstein and his British colleague, John Wilkes, merely dusted off the old British Colonial Office maps to arrive at their new Yemeni federation. Perhaps nowhere in the world will find more enthusiasts for the status quo ante than in the U.S. State Department and the British Foreign Office.

In an August 14, 2013 interview, Feierstein made it quite clear that the Yemeni “dialogue” was not a strictly Yemeni affair. He cited the assistance he had in framing the dialogue from European Union and British diplomats. Feierstein’s EU colleague, Michele Cervone D’Urso, left Yemen to engage in “nation building” across the Gulf of Aden in Somalia. Feierstein also had the support of Abdul Karim al-Iryani, the representative of the discredited Saleh dictatorship, the Gulf Cooperation Council of uber-wealthy oil kingdoms and potentates, western energy companies that are active in Yemen, the International Monetary Fund (which is already determining all the financial policies in Yemen), and the U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Florida.

Incredibly, Feierstein also stated that the most contentious issue between Yemen and the United States, the use of drones to conduct targeted killings of Yemeni citizens, many of them citizens, is “understood” by the Yemeni people based on “a little bit of polling data” and “what we hear from other people.” For Feierstein to suggest that Yemenis, many of them living in the remotest areas on the planet, could provide any legitimate polling data on what they think about aerial robots killing their relatives and friends flies in the face of reality.

Feierstein also said it was U.S. and United Nations policy to keep Yemen unified at all costs, regardless of the wishes of the secessionist Southern Movement or “Hirak.” Over 1300 Hirak fighters have been killed by Yemeni forces supported by their American military allies. In many cases, drone attacks on Hirak fighters, many of whom are secularists, have been reported as attacks on “Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula” or AQAP). If Al Qaeda never existed, the United States would have had to create it so it could act as a straw man for every U.S. intervention around the world. In fact, in places like Yemen, North Africa, and Syria, Al Qaeda is a total creation of the Central Intelligence Agency and other clandestine U.S. operators.

Feierstein and his neo-conservative colleagues have brushed off the boycott of the Yemeni dialogue by southern Yemeni leaders. The Saudis fear the southerners because of the legacy of the former Marxist-Leninist People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen, which granted the Soviet Union base rights in Aden and on the strategic island of Socotra in the Indian Ocean. The United States wants to ensure that an independent South Yemen is in no position to grant base rights to Russia or China. There have been reports of U.S. troops being sighted on Socotra conducting surveys for potential U.S. air and naval bases.

The proposed new federation of Yemen will only come into force after the adoption of a new constitution, a popular referendum, and presidential and legislative elections. It is clear that the United States and its allies will only recognize a Yemen that agrees to remain subservient to the Western military alliances, multinational energy companies, and the dictates of global bankers. Meanwhile, Houthis in north Yemen, Hirak supporters in South Yemen, and tribes in the Hadramaut continue to suffer from constant Yemeni military assaults supported by America’s killer robots in the sky.

The views of individual contributors do not necessarily represent those of the Strategic Culture Foundation.
While All Eyes Were on Ukraine, the West Hatched a Plan for Yemen

While the world’s eyes were transfixed on the events in Ukraine, with U.S. government officials and legislators making pilgrimages to Kiev to egg on the motley assortment of neo-fascists and World Bank globalists who, through civil disruption, intimidation, and violence, overthrew the democratically-elected government of President Viktor Yanukovych, the United States was busy carving a new identity for the nation of Yemen. Constantly under attack from CIA drones and cruise missiles, Yemen, which ousted its longtime dictator Ali Abdullah Saleh, during the “Arab Spring” movement, has now had a Western-imposed federation foisted upon it…

Recently, the pro-U.S. president, Abdrahab Mansur Hadi, and representatives from only a fraction of Yemen’s political parties, agreed to form a six-region federation that resulted from a so-called “national dialogue.” However, the plan announced in January by the much-ballyhooed National Dialogue Conference ignored the aspirations of the stakeholders in Yemen’s future, particularly the people of the former independent People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen, or South Yemen, who want their sovereignty restored after years of brutal rule from the Saleh regime in Sana’a in north Yemen.

Neither did the “dialogue” take into account the legitimate demands of the Shi’a Muslim minority in the north who have suffered from constant attacks from the Sana’a regime, attacks sometimes joined by military forces from neighboring Saudi Arabia. The Saudis never miss a chance to attack any group seen as being in league with Iran, whether they are the Shi’a majority of Bahrain, the Alawite minority of Syria, or the Shi’a Houthi minority of north Yemen.

Rather than split Yemen into its two former constituent regions, the former independent North Yemen and South Yemen, the foreign-directed “nation –builders” in Yemen opted to create six regions because they feared a region of South Yemen would provide the impetus for the region to re-establish its independence, lost when South Yemen agreed to merge with Yemen in an fateful and disastrous union in 1990.

The proposed six-region federation was largely the brainchild of the past U.S. ambassador to Yemen, Gerald Feierstein, who also served as deputy consul general in Jerusalem. Feierstein, who served as ambassador in Sana’a until October 2013, mirrored the interventionist style of other U.S. diplomats carrying certain ideological “baggage,” namely U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Geoffrey Pyatt and Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs Victoria Nuland (Nudelman).

The northern province of Saada, where most of the Shi’a Houthi live was cobbled together with the new Azal region, which also includes Sana’a, the capital. The Houthi Ansarullah rebel commander stated that Saada and the Houthis lost its special identity as a region having closer ties to coastal Hajja and Jawf than with Sana’a. However, considering Feierstein’s more than problematic ties with the Zionist-influenced neo-conservatives in Washington, the drawing of the borders of Azal had much to do with pleasing the enemies of the Houthis in Riyadh and Tel Aviv and sending a stark warning to the friends of the Houthis in Tehran.

Ansarullah leaders also realized that the Azal region was poor in natural resources with no maritime access. In other words, Feierstein and company punished the Shi’as by combining their province with the poorest region in Yemen and one that would lack economic clout in the new Yemeni federation. The other three proposed regions in the north are Saba, Janad, and Tahama. Rather than a unified South Yemen, the former independent socialist republic is divided into Aden and Hadramaut. The plan for South Yemen reflects hot the British Empire divided the territory.

The British ruled South Yemen directly through the Aden Protectorate, later the Federation of South Arabia, and through local sultans of Quaiti, Mahra, and Kathiri states through the Protectorate of South Arabia in the Hadramaut. Feierstein and his British colleague, John Wilkes, merely dusted off the old British Colonial Office maps to arrive at their new Yemeni federation. Perhaps nowhere in the world will find more enthusiasts for the status quo ante than in the U.S. State Department and the British Foreign Office.

In an August 14, 2013 interview, Feierstein made it quite clear that the Yemeni “dialogue” was not a strictly Yemeni affair. He cited the assistance he had in framing the dialogue from European Union and British diplomats. Feierstein’s EU colleague, Michele Cervone D’Urso, left Yemen to engage in “nation building” across the Gulf of Aden in Somalia. Feierstein also had the support of Abdul Karim al-Iryani, the representative of the discredited Saleh dictatorship, the Gulf Cooperation Council of uber-wealthy oil kingdoms and potentates, western energy companies that are active in Yemen, the International Monetary Fund (which is already determining all the financial policies in Yemen), and the U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Florida.

Incredibly, Feierstein also stated that the most contentious issue between Yemen and the United States, the use of drones to conduct targeted killings of Yemeni citizens, many of them citizens, is “understood” by the Yemeni people based on “a little bit of polling data” and “what we hear from other people.” For Feierstein to suggest that Yemenis, many of them living in the remotest areas on the planet, could provide any legitimate polling data on what they think about aerial robots killing their relatives and friends flies in the face of reality.

Feierstein also said it was U.S. and United Nations policy to keep Yemen unified at all costs, regardless of the wishes of the secessionist Southern Movement or “Hirak.” Over 1300 Hirak fighters have been killed by Yemeni forces supported by their American military allies. In many cases, drone attacks on Hirak fighters, many of whom are secularists, have been reported as attacks on “Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula” or AQAP). If Al Qaeda never existed, the United States would have had to create it so it could act as a straw man for every U.S. intervention around the world. In fact, in places like Yemen, North Africa, and Syria, Al Qaeda is a total creation of the Central Intelligence Agency and other clandestine U.S. operators.

Feierstein and his neo-conservative colleagues have brushed off the boycott of the Yemeni dialogue by southern Yemeni leaders. The Saudis fear the southerners because of the legacy of the former Marxist-Leninist People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen, which granted the Soviet Union base rights in Aden and on the strategic island of Socotra in the Indian Ocean. The United States wants to ensure that an independent South Yemen is in no position to grant base rights to Russia or China. There have been reports of U.S. troops being sighted on Socotra conducting surveys for potential U.S. air and naval bases.

The proposed new federation of Yemen will only come into force after the adoption of a new constitution, a popular referendum, and presidential and legislative elections. It is clear that the United States and its allies will only recognize a Yemen that agrees to remain subservient to the Western military alliances, multinational energy companies, and the dictates of global bankers. Meanwhile, Houthis in north Yemen, Hirak supporters in South Yemen, and tribes in the Hadramaut continue to suffer from constant Yemeni military assaults supported by America’s killer robots in the sky.