World
Igor Ignatchenko
May 20, 2012
© Photo: Public domain

Hungarian premier Victor Orban clearly stands in the way of the plans of the global elite for Europe. Hungary’s new constitution which was passed in the spring of 2011 and entered into force on January 1, 2012 unequivocally placed emphasis on Christian legacy and nationhood and was immediately seen as a challenge by the forces of global governance. It happens to be the first constitution in Europe reflecting a radical departure from multiculturalism and the present-day brand of tolerance, which in practice translate into the erosion of national identity and infinite acceptance of moral deviance. The preamble of the Hungarian constitution is titled «NATIONAL AVOWAL», which in itself must sound offensive to the EU ideologists who tend to condemn the concept of the nation as a harmful myth. Moreover, it states explicitly: «We recognise the role of Christianity in preserving nationhood», something that the post-Christian Europe cannot put up with.

According to the fundamental law of Hungary, part of the country’s coat of arms is the crown of Holy King Stephen who led Hungarians to convert to Christianity a millennium ago. The constitution preamble asserts the continuity between contemporary Hungary and its medieval predecessor-state which used to be much bigger and stretched across the territories of today’s Slovakia, Ukrainian Transcarpathia, and almost the entire Croatia, along with parts of Austria and Slovenia plus a half of today’s Romania.

Outraging the European proponents of gay rights, the new Hungarian constitution defined marriage as exclusively heterosexual. Germany, the country where the post of diplomacy chief is held by gay Guido Westerwelle, predictably spearheaded the campaign of hammering Hungary over the issue. The U.S. Department of State also showered the new Hungarian constitution with criticisms. U.S. Secretary of State H. Clinton expressed a view recently that human rights, above all, mean gay rights including the rights to gay marriage and demanded that Budapest subject the national legislation to a revision to meet the needs and tastes of gays and lesbians worldwide.

Importantly, the Hungarian constitution guarantees the protection of human life from the moment of inception. As a result, Hungary may become Europe’s second country, after Ireland, to outlaw abortion. The prospects alarmed groups like Amnesty International which hurriedly released a statement criticizing Hungary for allegedly infringing upon European and international human rights standards.

The EU administration frowned on Orban’s steps from the outset, and cracked down on him powerfully when his reforms went as far as to clip of the authority of the Hungarian Central Bank. In the dollar-dominated world, national central banks are not accountable to national governments which must borrow money from central banks instead of emitting it. To the displeasure of the global financial oligarchy, Orban made a bold attempt to subject the Hungarian central bank to the government oversight, with a special law being passed based on the new constitution. Over the past couple of years, Orban‘s economic reforms constantly drew the ire of International financial institutions. In the summer of 2010, Orban as the leader of Fidesz, the party which convincingly won the parliamentary elections, brushed off the IMF austerity suggestions and, defying the IMF discontent, slapped an additional tax on the banking sector. The IMF and the European Commission were further upset by Hungary‘s economic stability law which set the upper bound for sovereign debt depending on inflation and GDP growth. 

Overall, the central bank reform is central to Orban’s economic program. In response to it, the global financial watchdog Standard&Poor’s downgraded Hungary to a pre-default status, causing the worth of the Hungarian bonds to plummet. Early in 2012, when the new Hungarian constitution became a reality, the cost of the forint hit the historical low vs. the Euro. 

The Western media are attacking Orban non-stop. EU parliamentarian Cohn-Bendit famously likened the Hungarian premier to Hugo Chavez, while France’s L’Express mockingly gave him the title of a Budapest emperor and described Hungary as a country with an authoritarian and dictatorial regime. Worse than that, Orban is increasingly portrayed as a power-hungry new Hitler or the Hungarian Ceauşescu.

The opposition in Hungary is not wasting time either. The closure of the opposition Club Radio on completely legitimate grounds (the same radio frequency was given to an alternative bidder following a tender) triggerd an avalanche of allegations of free speech suppression in Hungary. Orban simply said that the propaganda of immoral lifestyles by media must not be tolerated. Speaking in the European parliament, he cited the common knowledge that Europe became what it is thanks to Christian values which now seem to be dropping out of sight and explained his own mission as the preservation of the Hungarian identity. 

The performance of the Hungarian opposition so far falls short of Brussels’ expectations. Former Hungarian president and Orban’s political partner Pal Schmitt faced charges of plagiarism in connection with his doctoral thesis and had to retire, but the race over the vacant post was won by Janos Ader, another associate of Orban who represented the Fidesz youth group and the Hungarians Christian democrats in the European parliament. On May 2, he scored 286 out of 386 in the Hungarian parliament in a vote which was shunned by the opposition but still drew enough ballots and highlighted the widespread support for the policies pursued by «Europe’s Hugo Chavez». 

Being a small country, Hungary has great difficulty withstanding the pressure mounted synchronously by the U.S., the EU, and the world financial bodies, especially considering that no support for it is visible internationally. A conflict between the old and the new Europe is brewing but so far has little impact on the European political landscape. Last January, Budapest was forced to bow to the EU demands and dilute three laws – on the central bank, the independence of the information department, and the lowered age limit for judges – which Brussels heavily attacked. The reason why Budapest gave in was that the IMF had put on hold the talks concerning the Euro 20b credit which Hungary desperately needs to climb out of crisis. Thus, the global financial oligarchy‘ armtwisting left the Hungarians with no alternative but to hand the national central bank over back under the control of the European Central Bank and scrap several economic reforms which were meant to reign in the transnational grands and boost national economic independence. In the case, the financial stranglehold proved impossible to evade.

Pressure on Hungary from Brussels is mounting: on April 25, the European Commission rolled out a lawsuit against Budapest in the European Court over EU treaty violations. European Commission president José Manuel Barroso is not going to suffice with the concessions already made and hopes to coerce the Hungarian administration into a deeper tailoring of the national legislation. Hungary is known to be financially embarassed at the moment and the International financial circles are going to fully seize the arising opportunities. 

Unseating Orban in a revolt within his own party is an option known to be discussed as the potential reaction in case his defense continues. A suitable alternative figure within the government camp – someone from Fidesz whose ambitions met with no understanding from political peers – is needed to render the plan realistic. Influential transnational groups have no shortage of experience in engineering such ousters – recently, Silvio Berlusconi in Italy and Georgios A. Papandreou in Greece fell victims to the ouster schemes and were replaced with the financial world’s protégés. 

The important of the developments in and around Hungary to international politics stems from the fact that the current Hungarian Administration was ahead of others in realizing the ruinous character of liberalism and – with enviable courage – taking to the defense of national identity. These days Hungarians are fully aware that in their country Europe needs cheap labor plus the market to absorb products otherwise having no niches – and, essentially, nothing else.

The views of individual contributors do not necessarily represent those of the Strategic Culture Foundation.
«Europe’s Hugo Chavez»

Hungarian premier Victor Orban clearly stands in the way of the plans of the global elite for Europe. Hungary’s new constitution which was passed in the spring of 2011 and entered into force on January 1, 2012 unequivocally placed emphasis on Christian legacy and nationhood and was immediately seen as a challenge by the forces of global governance. It happens to be the first constitution in Europe reflecting a radical departure from multiculturalism and the present-day brand of tolerance, which in practice translate into the erosion of national identity and infinite acceptance of moral deviance. The preamble of the Hungarian constitution is titled «NATIONAL AVOWAL», which in itself must sound offensive to the EU ideologists who tend to condemn the concept of the nation as a harmful myth. Moreover, it states explicitly: «We recognise the role of Christianity in preserving nationhood», something that the post-Christian Europe cannot put up with.

According to the fundamental law of Hungary, part of the country’s coat of arms is the crown of Holy King Stephen who led Hungarians to convert to Christianity a millennium ago. The constitution preamble asserts the continuity between contemporary Hungary and its medieval predecessor-state which used to be much bigger and stretched across the territories of today’s Slovakia, Ukrainian Transcarpathia, and almost the entire Croatia, along with parts of Austria and Slovenia plus a half of today’s Romania.

Outraging the European proponents of gay rights, the new Hungarian constitution defined marriage as exclusively heterosexual. Germany, the country where the post of diplomacy chief is held by gay Guido Westerwelle, predictably spearheaded the campaign of hammering Hungary over the issue. The U.S. Department of State also showered the new Hungarian constitution with criticisms. U.S. Secretary of State H. Clinton expressed a view recently that human rights, above all, mean gay rights including the rights to gay marriage and demanded that Budapest subject the national legislation to a revision to meet the needs and tastes of gays and lesbians worldwide.

Importantly, the Hungarian constitution guarantees the protection of human life from the moment of inception. As a result, Hungary may become Europe’s second country, after Ireland, to outlaw abortion. The prospects alarmed groups like Amnesty International which hurriedly released a statement criticizing Hungary for allegedly infringing upon European and international human rights standards.

The EU administration frowned on Orban’s steps from the outset, and cracked down on him powerfully when his reforms went as far as to clip of the authority of the Hungarian Central Bank. In the dollar-dominated world, national central banks are not accountable to national governments which must borrow money from central banks instead of emitting it. To the displeasure of the global financial oligarchy, Orban made a bold attempt to subject the Hungarian central bank to the government oversight, with a special law being passed based on the new constitution. Over the past couple of years, Orban‘s economic reforms constantly drew the ire of International financial institutions. In the summer of 2010, Orban as the leader of Fidesz, the party which convincingly won the parliamentary elections, brushed off the IMF austerity suggestions and, defying the IMF discontent, slapped an additional tax on the banking sector. The IMF and the European Commission were further upset by Hungary‘s economic stability law which set the upper bound for sovereign debt depending on inflation and GDP growth. 

Overall, the central bank reform is central to Orban’s economic program. In response to it, the global financial watchdog Standard&Poor’s downgraded Hungary to a pre-default status, causing the worth of the Hungarian bonds to plummet. Early in 2012, when the new Hungarian constitution became a reality, the cost of the forint hit the historical low vs. the Euro. 

The Western media are attacking Orban non-stop. EU parliamentarian Cohn-Bendit famously likened the Hungarian premier to Hugo Chavez, while France’s L’Express mockingly gave him the title of a Budapest emperor and described Hungary as a country with an authoritarian and dictatorial regime. Worse than that, Orban is increasingly portrayed as a power-hungry new Hitler or the Hungarian Ceauşescu.

The opposition in Hungary is not wasting time either. The closure of the opposition Club Radio on completely legitimate grounds (the same radio frequency was given to an alternative bidder following a tender) triggerd an avalanche of allegations of free speech suppression in Hungary. Orban simply said that the propaganda of immoral lifestyles by media must not be tolerated. Speaking in the European parliament, he cited the common knowledge that Europe became what it is thanks to Christian values which now seem to be dropping out of sight and explained his own mission as the preservation of the Hungarian identity. 

The performance of the Hungarian opposition so far falls short of Brussels’ expectations. Former Hungarian president and Orban’s political partner Pal Schmitt faced charges of plagiarism in connection with his doctoral thesis and had to retire, but the race over the vacant post was won by Janos Ader, another associate of Orban who represented the Fidesz youth group and the Hungarians Christian democrats in the European parliament. On May 2, he scored 286 out of 386 in the Hungarian parliament in a vote which was shunned by the opposition but still drew enough ballots and highlighted the widespread support for the policies pursued by «Europe’s Hugo Chavez». 

Being a small country, Hungary has great difficulty withstanding the pressure mounted synchronously by the U.S., the EU, and the world financial bodies, especially considering that no support for it is visible internationally. A conflict between the old and the new Europe is brewing but so far has little impact on the European political landscape. Last January, Budapest was forced to bow to the EU demands and dilute three laws – on the central bank, the independence of the information department, and the lowered age limit for judges – which Brussels heavily attacked. The reason why Budapest gave in was that the IMF had put on hold the talks concerning the Euro 20b credit which Hungary desperately needs to climb out of crisis. Thus, the global financial oligarchy‘ armtwisting left the Hungarians with no alternative but to hand the national central bank over back under the control of the European Central Bank and scrap several economic reforms which were meant to reign in the transnational grands and boost national economic independence. In the case, the financial stranglehold proved impossible to evade.

Pressure on Hungary from Brussels is mounting: on April 25, the European Commission rolled out a lawsuit against Budapest in the European Court over EU treaty violations. European Commission president José Manuel Barroso is not going to suffice with the concessions already made and hopes to coerce the Hungarian administration into a deeper tailoring of the national legislation. Hungary is known to be financially embarassed at the moment and the International financial circles are going to fully seize the arising opportunities. 

Unseating Orban in a revolt within his own party is an option known to be discussed as the potential reaction in case his defense continues. A suitable alternative figure within the government camp – someone from Fidesz whose ambitions met with no understanding from political peers – is needed to render the plan realistic. Influential transnational groups have no shortage of experience in engineering such ousters – recently, Silvio Berlusconi in Italy and Georgios A. Papandreou in Greece fell victims to the ouster schemes and were replaced with the financial world’s protégés. 

The important of the developments in and around Hungary to international politics stems from the fact that the current Hungarian Administration was ahead of others in realizing the ruinous character of liberalism and – with enviable courage – taking to the defense of national identity. These days Hungarians are fully aware that in their country Europe needs cheap labor plus the market to absorb products otherwise having no niches – and, essentially, nothing else.