World
Arhive
March 26, 2011
© Photo: Public domain

Konstantin GORDEEV – Independent analyst and researcher

Over the past 12 years since the NATO aggression against  Yugoslavia, this is not the first time we are witnessing an international intervention – blessed by the UN and upholding the slogans of human rights and democracy – target a sovereign country. Chaos control is not a novel strategy and the international law has been dead for quite a while. In March, 1999 NATO pounded Belgrade, Pristina, and other cities of the former Yugoslavia, the country which endured the initial testing of the new global blueprint in the 1990ies.

Actually, the concept of chaos in dynamical systems is over fifty years old. It originated from mathematical studies but later surfaced even in Z. Brzezinski's writings which saw the light of day in the 1970ies and defined the course of constructing the new world order for decades to come.

Pragmatic motivations loom behind the applications of the theory of chaos in deterministic systems in at least 90% of cases, but even apart from the fact the concept appears to be a reincarnation of the divide et impera – divide and rule – strategy aimed at undermining national sovereignty, grabbing control over natural resources (primarily the energy but also the technological capabilities) of independent countries, and enabling the architects of the new world order to strengthen their positions using the potentials of the regions put under their control.

The four NATO “peace-keeping” missions launched over the period of time starting in 1999 – those in Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya – provide enough material to realize what the offensives have in common in terms of their international politics implications. First, all likewise campaigns meant to give NATO control over territories and natural resources unfold with intense media backing. Victims of the aggressions are demonized and portrayed as enemies of civilization and humanity while, accordingly, the aggressions are sold to the public whose narrow vision is limited to TV screens and computer monitors as acts of justice. Secondly, the drug mafia or local extremist and separatist groups act as provocateurs helping build the underlying storylines for the corresponding propaganda campaigns. The linkage between drug-related organized crime and NATO aggressions may seem paradoxical, but the majority of the countries which fell victims to NATO aggressions were either crossed by important drug-trafficking routes or known to be among the key drug supply hubs. For example, Afghanistan and Iraq accounted for the lion's share of the world's hashish, marijuana, and heroin output, and the Kosovo Albanians as an ethnic group existed largely as a huge mafia clan whose leader H. Thaci, former drug lord turned premier of the self-proclaimed Kosovo, was Europe's key drug business figure.

Map of the world's key drug trafficking routes

The connection between the alleged fighters for ethnic and religious freedom and the members of drug groups – oftentimes actually the same characters – is an open secret. Russia's drug enforcement agency chief V. Ivanov stressed at a media briefing in Rome on March 2, 2011 that on top of eroding public health and undermining public order, drug trafficking tends to contribute to political destabilizations and thus bring about serious consequences for the respective societies. He said there is information that drug trafficking is the root cause of the proliferation of organized crime and of the outbreaks of unrest in Nigeria, Côte d'Ivoire, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. According to V. Ivanov, the recent revolution in some of the above countries were in fact attributable to the drug-related organized crime. Thirdly, the tendency is that – drawing justification from the myths floated by the media and the intelligence services – institutes of global governance promptly issue mandates for attacks against the defiant regimes. After that, the countries eager to prop up the new world order – relying on their absolute military superiority and therefore taking no risks – are free to devastate the victims' military and civilian infrastructures. In the process, the civilian death toll typically far exceeds the fatalities in the ranks of the mafia whose hitmen posed as freedom fighters. Fourthly, the countries forced to capitulate usually become the international drug mafia's prey. Representatives of the drug-dealing and separatist groups which from the outset unleashed the unrest or the envoys of their influential patrons dispatched to the defeated countries to impose on them the new, ostensibly democratic standards take positions in the post-war officialdom, and the countries' strategic natural and technological resources are ceded to transnational corporations. The populations on the formerly sovereign territories find themselves deprived of all sources of socioeconomic development and evolve into human material to be used by the mafia. Overseen by NATO, countries take the shape of gangster states where the people are divided into criminal groups' henchmen or mafia's servants, slaves, and victims.

The situations under the NATO-installed regimes – with puppet dictators, mafia infighting, and total disregard for human rights – are akin to what used to be seen in colonies. Reflecting a minor fraction of the above, the media do supply ample evidence: the US forces reportedly humiliated the Iraqis and Afghans, NATO aircrafts deliberately hunted the locals in combat zones, prisoners faced sexual harassment, and Thaci's center for forced extractions of human organs for sale in the EU and the US functioned at the very heart of Europe.

The processes help the architects of the new world order accumulate wealth and put into practice the population reduction programs but still are peripheral to their strategy. Obviously, the true priority is to widen and to energize the zone of remote-controlled chaos affecting the entire globalizing world. In the long run, this chaos is supposed to lead to the redistribution of the world in line with a fairly abstract socioeconomic model.

The revolutions which shattered North Africa and the Middle East in January-March, 2011 were intended to create a belt of continuous chaos spanning from Afghanistan to Morocco (at the moment Libya which put up resistance to the NATO aggression and Iran, the country which clearly is not going to shed its sovereignty, is putting roadblocks in the way of the plan). In addition to such undisguised geopolitical objectives as the formation of a strategic foothold from which the entire Eurasia plus North Africa could be held at gunpoint as well as the establishment of an energy pricing monopoly capable of arbitrarily triggering or suppressing global crises, the geopolitical design's purpose was to propagate chaos, mainly to the European-culture countries, by channeling to them an ever greater flow of migrants and drugs.

It is unlikely that the resulting mix will reach an explosive concentration in the nearest future, but the ethnic discord brewing in Germany and France and its socioeconomic consequences already promise a full-scale collapse. No doubt, the old Europe's hour of reckoning will come some day, though at present the global architects are preoccupied with the already vulnerable countries like Syria, Iran, and Venezuela. Iran is the priority target as the likely candidate for a chaos-driven preemptive revolt and as the country which dared to express opposition to Israel, to remain a gap in the criminal zone spanning from Afghanistan to Morocco, and to resolutely fight drug trafficking.

For Iran, a war with the “proponents of democracy” is imminent. Part of the reason is that the recent revolutions in the Arab world left Tehran short of allies and strengthened Israel's positions, but it also plays a role that the war against Iran in the virtual world is already raging and that in NATO's plans the country is the next country on the list after Libya (or after Libya and Syria).

The final questions is: how did banditry evolve into the number one form of present-day geopolitics and the organized crime with its armed groups – emerge as the preeminent instrument of the new world order? The answer is simple: a misinterpreted model borrowed from mathematics and successfully applied as a rationale for a socioeconomic overhaul served to transform a part of the mankind into a network organization structurally similar to the traditional mafia. The structural similarity echoes with a commonality of forms, principles, methods, and algorithms. The implications for the world-system are not hard to grasp.
 

The views of individual contributors do not necessarily represent those of the Strategic Culture Foundation.
Organized Crime as the New World Order’s Backbone

Konstantin GORDEEV – Independent analyst and researcher

Over the past 12 years since the NATO aggression against  Yugoslavia, this is not the first time we are witnessing an international intervention – blessed by the UN and upholding the slogans of human rights and democracy – target a sovereign country. Chaos control is not a novel strategy and the international law has been dead for quite a while. In March, 1999 NATO pounded Belgrade, Pristina, and other cities of the former Yugoslavia, the country which endured the initial testing of the new global blueprint in the 1990ies.

Actually, the concept of chaos in dynamical systems is over fifty years old. It originated from mathematical studies but later surfaced even in Z. Brzezinski's writings which saw the light of day in the 1970ies and defined the course of constructing the new world order for decades to come.

Pragmatic motivations loom behind the applications of the theory of chaos in deterministic systems in at least 90% of cases, but even apart from the fact the concept appears to be a reincarnation of the divide et impera – divide and rule – strategy aimed at undermining national sovereignty, grabbing control over natural resources (primarily the energy but also the technological capabilities) of independent countries, and enabling the architects of the new world order to strengthen their positions using the potentials of the regions put under their control.

The four NATO “peace-keeping” missions launched over the period of time starting in 1999 – those in Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya – provide enough material to realize what the offensives have in common in terms of their international politics implications. First, all likewise campaigns meant to give NATO control over territories and natural resources unfold with intense media backing. Victims of the aggressions are demonized and portrayed as enemies of civilization and humanity while, accordingly, the aggressions are sold to the public whose narrow vision is limited to TV screens and computer monitors as acts of justice. Secondly, the drug mafia or local extremist and separatist groups act as provocateurs helping build the underlying storylines for the corresponding propaganda campaigns. The linkage between drug-related organized crime and NATO aggressions may seem paradoxical, but the majority of the countries which fell victims to NATO aggressions were either crossed by important drug-trafficking routes or known to be among the key drug supply hubs. For example, Afghanistan and Iraq accounted for the lion's share of the world's hashish, marijuana, and heroin output, and the Kosovo Albanians as an ethnic group existed largely as a huge mafia clan whose leader H. Thaci, former drug lord turned premier of the self-proclaimed Kosovo, was Europe's key drug business figure.

Map of the world's key drug trafficking routes

The connection between the alleged fighters for ethnic and religious freedom and the members of drug groups – oftentimes actually the same characters – is an open secret. Russia's drug enforcement agency chief V. Ivanov stressed at a media briefing in Rome on March 2, 2011 that on top of eroding public health and undermining public order, drug trafficking tends to contribute to political destabilizations and thus bring about serious consequences for the respective societies. He said there is information that drug trafficking is the root cause of the proliferation of organized crime and of the outbreaks of unrest in Nigeria, Côte d'Ivoire, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. According to V. Ivanov, the recent revolution in some of the above countries were in fact attributable to the drug-related organized crime. Thirdly, the tendency is that – drawing justification from the myths floated by the media and the intelligence services – institutes of global governance promptly issue mandates for attacks against the defiant regimes. After that, the countries eager to prop up the new world order – relying on their absolute military superiority and therefore taking no risks – are free to devastate the victims' military and civilian infrastructures. In the process, the civilian death toll typically far exceeds the fatalities in the ranks of the mafia whose hitmen posed as freedom fighters. Fourthly, the countries forced to capitulate usually become the international drug mafia's prey. Representatives of the drug-dealing and separatist groups which from the outset unleashed the unrest or the envoys of their influential patrons dispatched to the defeated countries to impose on them the new, ostensibly democratic standards take positions in the post-war officialdom, and the countries' strategic natural and technological resources are ceded to transnational corporations. The populations on the formerly sovereign territories find themselves deprived of all sources of socioeconomic development and evolve into human material to be used by the mafia. Overseen by NATO, countries take the shape of gangster states where the people are divided into criminal groups' henchmen or mafia's servants, slaves, and victims.

The situations under the NATO-installed regimes – with puppet dictators, mafia infighting, and total disregard for human rights – are akin to what used to be seen in colonies. Reflecting a minor fraction of the above, the media do supply ample evidence: the US forces reportedly humiliated the Iraqis and Afghans, NATO aircrafts deliberately hunted the locals in combat zones, prisoners faced sexual harassment, and Thaci's center for forced extractions of human organs for sale in the EU and the US functioned at the very heart of Europe.

The processes help the architects of the new world order accumulate wealth and put into practice the population reduction programs but still are peripheral to their strategy. Obviously, the true priority is to widen and to energize the zone of remote-controlled chaos affecting the entire globalizing world. In the long run, this chaos is supposed to lead to the redistribution of the world in line with a fairly abstract socioeconomic model.

The revolutions which shattered North Africa and the Middle East in January-March, 2011 were intended to create a belt of continuous chaos spanning from Afghanistan to Morocco (at the moment Libya which put up resistance to the NATO aggression and Iran, the country which clearly is not going to shed its sovereignty, is putting roadblocks in the way of the plan). In addition to such undisguised geopolitical objectives as the formation of a strategic foothold from which the entire Eurasia plus North Africa could be held at gunpoint as well as the establishment of an energy pricing monopoly capable of arbitrarily triggering or suppressing global crises, the geopolitical design's purpose was to propagate chaos, mainly to the European-culture countries, by channeling to them an ever greater flow of migrants and drugs.

It is unlikely that the resulting mix will reach an explosive concentration in the nearest future, but the ethnic discord brewing in Germany and France and its socioeconomic consequences already promise a full-scale collapse. No doubt, the old Europe's hour of reckoning will come some day, though at present the global architects are preoccupied with the already vulnerable countries like Syria, Iran, and Venezuela. Iran is the priority target as the likely candidate for a chaos-driven preemptive revolt and as the country which dared to express opposition to Israel, to remain a gap in the criminal zone spanning from Afghanistan to Morocco, and to resolutely fight drug trafficking.

For Iran, a war with the “proponents of democracy” is imminent. Part of the reason is that the recent revolutions in the Arab world left Tehran short of allies and strengthened Israel's positions, but it also plays a role that the war against Iran in the virtual world is already raging and that in NATO's plans the country is the next country on the list after Libya (or after Libya and Syria).

The final questions is: how did banditry evolve into the number one form of present-day geopolitics and the organized crime with its armed groups – emerge as the preeminent instrument of the new world order? The answer is simple: a misinterpreted model borrowed from mathematics and successfully applied as a rationale for a socioeconomic overhaul served to transform a part of the mankind into a network organization structurally similar to the traditional mafia. The structural similarity echoes with a commonality of forms, principles, methods, and algorithms. The implications for the world-system are not hard to grasp.